ß Click on left for BookmarksCUT Light .NET UFL 
User Function Library for email, Text, ini Files, Time Zones, SQL, Images, Text, Registry, Windows, Memory, Geo, Excel, Font, Web, HTML, Excel, etc.

 

 

www.MilletSoftware.com

 

Version 6.4.9035

(October 2017)

By

 

Ido Millet



5275 Rome Court, Erie PA 16509
ido@MilletSoftware.com
(814) 825-6009

 

 

 

Disclaimer:  These component and accompanying files are provided “as-is” by Ido Millet without assuming any responsibility for harm to computer systems, software, or data with which these files are used.

 

Notes:
All functions provided by this User Function Library are prefixed with ‘
ufl’.
To simplify the discussion, the user manual typically ignores that prefix.

The .NET version of the CUT Light UFL is compatible with most functions in the COM version, except for emailing functions. This version uses better emailing functions by
using saved emailing options within an ini file and a newer emailing component.

 

 

 




Introduction.. 7

Install / Uninstall.. 8

Windows & Miscelleneous. 9

uflNewKey() 9

Avoiding Duplicate Processing (New Approach) 9

uflClipboardSetText() 9

uflLookupAddEntry() 10

uflLookupGetEntry() 10

uflLookupResetEntries() 11

uflGetUser() 12

uflGetMachineName() 12

uflGetRegisteredCompanyName() 12

uflGetDiskSerialNumber() 12

uflGetMachineIPAddress() 12

uflGetEnvironmentVar() 13

uflCreateGUID() 13

uflBitWiseAnd() 13

uflNormDist() 14

uflVisualCutRun() 14

uflEXERun() 15

uflBatchFileRun() 16

uflCmdRun() 16

Images & Barcodes. 17

uflGetImageProperties() 17

uflImageResize() 17

uflBarcodeQR() or uflBBarcodeQR() 18

uflBarcodePDF417() or uflBBarcodePDF417() 19

uflBarcodeDataMatrix() or uflBBarcodeDataMatrix () 20

uflBarcodeAztec() or uflBBarcodeAztec() 21

uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39() 22

uflBarcode93() or uflBBarcode93() 22

uflBarcode128() or uflBBarcode128() 22

uflBarcodeITF() or uflBBarcodeITF() 22

uflBarcodeCodeBar() or uflBBarcodeCodeBar() 22

uflBarcodeMSI() or uflBBarcodeMSI() 22

uflBarcodePlessey() or uflBBarcodePlessey() 22

uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA() 23

uflBarcodeUpcE() or uflBBarcodeUpcE() 23

uflBarcodeUpcEanExtension() or uflBBarcodeUpcEanExtension() 23

uflBarcodeITF() or uflBBarcodeITF() 23

uflBarcodeEAN8() or uflBBarcodeEAN8() 23

uflBarcodeEAN13() or uflBBarcodeEAN13() 23

String/Text Manipulations. 24

uflPopulateTemplate() 24

uflExpandStringwithEnvironmentVar() 24

uflReplaceAccentedChars() 24

uflHex2Ascii() 25

uflHex2Number() 25

uflConvertRTF2Text() 26

uflConvertRTFFileToText() 26

Regular Expressions. 27

uflRegExpIsMatch() 27

uflRegExpMatch() 27

uflRegExpReplace() 27

File/ini/registry.. 28

uflFileAge() 28

uflFileCompare() 28

uflFileCopy() 28

uflFileDelete () 28

uflFileExists() 28

uflFileRename() 28

uflFileJustName() 28

uflFileJustPath() 28

uflFileAddText() 29

uflFileAddTextKey() 31

uflFileGetText() 32

uflFileGetTextUTF8() 32

uflFileListFromWildCards() 33

uflFileUnzip() 34

uflGetTempFolder() 35

uflGetINIValue() 35

uflSetINIValue() 35

uflGetRegistryString() 35

uflLookupText() 35

GMT/Local and Time-Related.. 36

uflGMTtoLocalMinutes() 36

uflGMTtoLocal() 36

Evaluating Report Processing Elapsed Time. 37

uflGMTtoZone() 38

uflSecondsToTimeString() 39

uflTimeStringToSeconds() 39

Message/Input Boxes. 40

uflMessageBoxOK() 40

uflMessageBoxYesNo() 40

uflInputBox() 41

uflInputBox2Command() 42

Web/HTML/Google.. 43

uflHTMLfile2RTFfile() 43

uflHTMLstring2RTFFile() 44

uflHTMLString2Txtfile() 45

uflhttpFileExists() 46

uflhttpExists() 46

uflhttpFileDownload() 47

uflhttpFileDownloadRename() 47

uflhttpToImage() 48

uflHTML2Image() 49

uflhttpCallServiceGetTokens() 50

uflGoogleTranslate() 51

uflIpDot2Long() 52

uflIpLong2Dot() 52

SQL.. 53

uflExecuteSQLCanConnect() 53

uflExecuteSQLNoReturn() 54

Avoiding Duplicate Processing (old approach) 55

uflExecuteSQLReturnValue() 56

Example with a Connection String. 57

uflExecuteSQLReturnFile() 57

uflExecuteSQLReturnDelimited() 58

uflExecuteSQLReturnDelimitedSegment() 59

Geo.. 60

uflDistance() 60

uflDistanceByZip5() 60

uflDistanceByZipUK() 60

uflDistanceByZip() 61

uflGetLatLongFromZip() 62

uflGetLatLongFromZip5() 62

uflGoogleAddress2LatLong() 63

uflGoogleDrivingTimeDistance() 63

Excel.. 64

uflGetXLSValue() 64

uflSetXLSValue() 64

uflGetXLSOutput() 64

uflXLSLookUp() 65

Font.. 66

uflGetTextWidth() 66

uflGetFontSizeToFitText() 66

uflGetTextHeight() 66

uflGetTextNumberOfLines() 66

Encryption.. 67

uflBlowFishEncrypt() 67

uflBlowFishDecrypt() 67

uflBlowFishDecryptSegment() 68

Email.. 69

uflEmailSetOptionsIniFile() 69

uflSetEmailSaveEncryptedPassword() 70

uflEmailSend() 70

Full Example. 71

Specifying Multiple (Simple/Composite) Email Addresses. 72

Specifying Email Distribution Lists in Text Files. 72

Specifying Email Distribution Lists in SQL Queries. 73

Attaching Multiple Files. 73

Specifying a Different Character Set 74

Queuing Emails & The smtpQ Service. 74

uflIsValidEmail() 74

uflIsValidEmails() 74

Update History.. 75

Version 6.4.9035 (10/21/2017): 75

Version 6.4.9034 (10/18/2017): 75

Version 6.4.9031 (9/15/2017): 75

Version 6.4.9029 (7/27/2017): 75

Version 6.4.9025 (6/21/2017): 75

Version 6.4.9024 (5/30/2017): 76

Version 6.4.9019 (4/8/2017): 76

Version 6.4.9018 (2/17/2017): 76

Version 6.4.9017 (10/26/2016): 76

Version 6.4.9014 (10/17/2016): 76

Version 6.4.9012 (10/11/2016): 76

Version 6.4.9011 (9/11/2016): 76

Version 6.4.9009 (8/28/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9008 (8/3/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9007 (4/26/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9006 (4/13/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9005 (3/19/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9004 (2/24/2016): 77

Version 6.4.9001  (10/12/2015): 77

Version 6.4.8002  (9/26/2015): 77

Version 6.4.6005  (9/19/2015): 77

Version 6.4.6001  (8/13/2015): 77

Version 6.4.4001  (8/5/2015): 78

Version 6.4.2001  (6/4/2015): 78

Version 6.3.1006  (4/1/2015) 78

Version 6.3.1  (1/2/2015): Released .NET version. 78

Known Issues and Limitation.. 79

 


Introduction

 

CUT Light allows you to use functions within Crystal Report formulas to:

 

  1. E-mail dynamic-content messages from within any section of a Crystal report via  SMTP (used by e-mail clients such as Eudora, Outlook, Outlook Express, Netscape Messenger, Pegasus Mail, etc.). 

    A variety of options are supported including multiple recipients, CC Recipients, BCC recipients, and attachment files. 
    These options can be specified by using the EmailSet() function call within a Crystal formula and by appending more elements or more text via follow-up EmailAdd() function calls before triggering the email via an EmailSend function call. 

 

  1. Append Content to Text Files  
    Note: this can be used to take snapshots of information each time the report runs (for example, via Visual CUT scheduled processing). Another Crystal report can then use the text file as a data source for information across multiple snapshots.

 

  1. Read Content of Text/RTF/HTML Files
    Provide the file path & name as an argument to the FileGetText() function and get the file content as a string.  You can use Crystal's formatting options to interpret the string as RTF or HTML.  You can also use Crystal's string search and manipulation functions to lookup values inside the text file.

 

4.     Check a File Exists (Local or Web)

 

5.     Execute SQL statements against any ODBC data source

 

6.     Lookup & Set Values in *.ini files

 

7.     Lookup Values in the Registry

 

8.     Replace Accented Characters with Regular Ones

 

9.     Convert GMT/UTC to Local or Specified Time Zone

10.                        Compute Distance between Points (by zip codes or by Lat/Long)

 

11.                        Trigger another Application via a Command Line

 

12.                        Trigger Message & Input Boxes Based On Report Content

 

13.                        Embed Input from User in Command Line Calls

 

14.                        Trigger Report Processing by Visual CUT or DataLink Viewer

 

15.                        Convert HTML to RTF for Better Rendering in Crystal

 

16.                        Convert HEX strings to Values

 

  1. Get the 'User Name' & 'PC Name' Running the Report
    Note: this can be used to impose row-level security or to address data access tracking requirements such as those imposed by HIPAA.

 

  1. Encrypt/Decrypt Text

 

  1. Call Web Services and Return Values

 

  1. Resize Images

  2. Generate barcodes without special fonts

  3. Regular Expressions

  4. And more…



Install / Uninstall

 

The zip file you received should contain a CRUFLido_Light.msi (Microsoft Installer) file containing all the files to be installed and this document.  Double-Clicking the CRUFLido_Light.msi file will start the installation process, which takes care of registering the dll’s and, unless you specify another location, defaults to installing some files to the
C:\Program Files\CRUFLido_Light\ directory. 

Double-Clicking the CRUFLido_Light.msi file again after the installation, allows you to Uninstall the software. 

 

If prompted during the install process, you should elect to ignore cases where the file is already being used on your PC (skipping the install of that file) and not overwrite files on your PC with older versions from the Install.



 

After the installation, the formula editor within Crystal should show the following new functions (under Additional Functions):

 

Windows & Miscelleneous

 

uflNewKey()

Arguments: (KeyString)

Returns: 
True if the string is a new key (a NewKey() call hasn’t been issued for it within
the same report preview session).
False, if this is a new unique key, in which case it gets added to an internal set of keys that is reset only when a new report preview is triggered.

 

This function can be used to avoid duplicate processing and to compute Distinct Sums.


Avoiding Duplicate Processing (New Approach)


Crystal might evaluate the same formula multiple times, as it renders the page content (particularly when Keep Together properties cause shifting of page content from one page to another). To avoid duplicate processing of CUT Light function, you can use the NewKey() above to ensure the same process is not triggered twice. Here is an example:

WhilePrintingRecords;

IF uflNewKey({Product_Type.Product Type Name}) Then

    FileAddText("c:\temp\testNewkey.txt",
         {Product_Type.Product Type Name}, False, True)


This formula writes to text file only if the NewKey() function confirms that the current Product Type Name hasn’t been processed yet. 


uflClipboardSetText()


Arguments:
(TextToSet)

 

Returns:  The text specified as an argument.

For example: ClipboardSetText (ToText({Invoice.Invoice_N},0,’’)


 

uflLookupAddEntry()

Arguments (sKey, sValue)
Returns: "OK" if the Kay-Value pair was successfully added to memory.

Use ToText() in your formula to convert non-string Key or Value data
If the Key already exists, the entry gets replaced with the new Value.

Example of subreport loading total payments by Customer into Key-Value pairs in memory:
image

uflLookupGetEntry()

Arguments (sKey)
Returns: The Value from matching Kay-Value pair found in memory or "Entry Not Found".

 

Example of a main report getting values that were loaded by the subreport above
(note that the subreport can reside in a suppressed section):
image

image

uflLookupResetEntries()

Arguments: none
Returns: "OK" or error message

Used to reset all entries previously set via LookupAddEntry() calls.
This is useful in cases where a user runs multiple reports without closing the reporting software (Crystal, DataLink Viewer, …) between reports.

uflGetUser()

No arguments. 
Returns: a String with the ID of the user logged to the PC.

Note: among other things, this can be used to address data access tracking requirements such as those imposed by HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act). By using GetUser() and FileAddText() you can log to a text file information about who accessed what patient information and on what date.



uflGetMachineName()

No arguments. 
Returns: a String with the PC name where the Crystal report is running.



uflGetRegisteredCompanyName()

No arguments. 
Returns: a String with the Windows Registered Company Name.



uflGetDiskSerialNumber()

Arguments: (FormatAsHex)

 

Returns: the serial number of the current disk drive. 
If the FormatAsHex argument is set to True, the number is returned formatted as HEX. 

Returns: a String displaying the serial number of the current disk drive
as a number (e.g. -1808600113) or as Hex (e.g. 9432F3CF)



uflGetMachineIPAddress()

No arguments. 
Returns: a String with the IP Address of the machine where the Crystal report is running.



 

uflGetEnvironmentVar()

Arguments: (VariableName)

Returns: The environment variable value for the specified variable name. 

 

Note: typical environment variable names include:

AppData

LOCALAPPDATA

PATH

ProgramFiles

CommonProgramFiles
SystemDrive
WinDir
UserDomain
UserProfile

 

For example, the following Crystal formula:

GetEnvironmentVar ("AppData")

returns a value such as:
C:\Users\ido\AppData\Roaming


uflCreateGUID()


Arguments:
none 

Returns: a GUID as string.

Example:   CreateGuid()  
returns:  {E0DDC73A-E7FA-484A-A640-4DC79315AA16}


 

uflBitWiseAnd()


Arguments:
(Integer1, Integer2)

 

Returns:  The result (as Integer) of a BitWise AND operation on the two input integers.
 
For example: BitWiseAnd(13, 6)

Returns: 4

 

 

uflNormDist()


Arguments:
(x, mean, std)

 

Returns:  the cumulative probability for the value x under a normal distribution with the specified mean and standard deviation.

For example: NormDist(7, 5, 2) = 0.8413

 

uflVisualCutRun()

Arguments: (VisualCUTExePath, CommandLineArguments)

This function triggers processing of another report by Visual CUT. Visual CUT is a Crystal Report Manager package developed by Millet Software (www.MilletSoftware.com).

A typical scenario for using this functionality is running a report on Crystal Enterprise (or another software package), and using the viewing of that report as a trigger mechanism for exporting, printing, and/or e-mailing of information in another report.


Returns: 'Done' if the Visual CUT executable was found in the specified path. Otherwise, returns an error message. 

 

For example, the following Crystal formula:

VisualCutRun ("C:\Program Files\Visual CUT\Visual CUT.exe", "-e ""C:\Program Files\Visual CUT\Visual_CUT.rpt"" ""Parm1:1996""")

Triggers processing of the Visual_CUT.rpt sample report, overriding the saved parameter value with a value of 1996. 

Note that each double (") quotes in the command line, must be duplicated ("") within the formula so it is recognized as such.



 

uflEXERun()

Arguments: (ExePath, CommandLineArguments)

This function triggers another application (EXE or Bat or Cmd file),
passing to it a command line.

Returns: 'Done' if the executable was found in the specified path. Otherwise, returns an error message. 

 

This function is very similar to VisualCutRun, except that it is free to call any application (not just Visual CUT).  You can still use the ExeRun to call Visual CUT.  For example, the following Crystal formula:

ExeRun ("C:\Program Files\Visual CUT\Visual CUT.exe", "-e ""C:\Program Files\Visual CUT\Visual_CUT.rpt"" ""Parm1:1996""")

Triggers processing of the Visual_CUT.rpt sample report, overriding the saved parameter value with a value of 1996. 

Note that each double (") quotes in the command line, must be duplicated ("") within the formula so it is recognized as such.



 

uflBatchFileRun()

Arguments: (BatchFilePath, Arguments, Visibility)

This function triggers batch file passing to it optional arguments and controlling the visibility of the batch file window. If Visibility is set to "Hidden" the process window is hidden. Otherwise, it is visible.


Note: if there's a chance your arguments might contain special characters that interfere with passing them to the batch file (these include commas, spaces, <, >, ^, |) pass the arguments by enclosing them in single quotes within the double quotes like this: 
uFLBatchFileRun("C:\Batch\test.cmd", '"Jane Doe"', "Normal")
Then, handle the remaining double-quotes on the receiving side.
 
Returns: 'Done' or error message. 

 

Note: use of CmdRun() or BatchFileRun() requires a 1-time user permission to trigger such functions. The permission is stored as an entry in the CUT_Light_Options.ini file.

image

 

uflCmdRun()

Arguments: (CommandLineArguments)
This function triggers Cmd.exe passing to it a command line.
Returns: 'Done' or error message. 


See comments above 1st-time permission and special characters in section about BatchFileRun() above.

This function is very similar to EXERun except that the EXE is Cmd.exe and you don't need to figure out the path to that executable and how to trigger it without leaving a command window open.

For example, the following Crystal formula:

uFLCmdRun("del c:\temp\*.tmp")
would delete all files with .tmp extensions in the temp folder.

Images & Barcodes

 

uflGetImageProperties()


Arguments:
(image file path & name)      

Returns: Width/Height string.

Example:   GetImageProperties("c:\temp\MyLogo.jpg")   
returns:  90/111

Notes:
- If image file in not found, the function returns "File Not Found"
- Supported image types are: JPEG, JPG, GIF, BMP and PNG
- If image type is not supported, the function returns "Image Type Not Supported"

 

 

uflImageResize()


Arguments:
(url or image file path & name, new image file path & name, Width, Height,
                  MaintainProportion, Options)            

Returns: The path to the new resized image file.

Example:   ImageResize ("c:\Pictures\MyLogo.jpg","c:\Temp\MyLogo.jpg",180, 222, TRUE, "")   
returns:  "c:\Temp\MyLogo.jpg"  (the path the new resized image file

Notes:
- Width & Height are in points. 72 points = 1 inch.
- image file path and name can be a URL. For example:
        uFLImageResize("http://acme/Glider.jpg", "c:\temp\Glider.jpg", 1600, 900, False, "")

- If MaintainProportion is set to TRUE, the image is resized to best fit within the specified  
       dimensions.

- You can convert on the fly between image formats by specifying a different file extension.
   For example to convert from jpg to png:
   uflImageResize("c:\temp\Glider.jpg", "c:\temp\Glider_Resized.png", 180, 222, True, "")

- Leave the Options argument blank (""). It is included to support future functionality

 


 

uflBarcodeQR() or uflBBarcodeQR()


Arguments:
(TextContent(), CharacterSet, DisableECI, ErrorCorrectionLevel,

                                  ImageWidth, ImageHeight, AddedMargin, LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate a QR Code image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent() divides the desired content into an array with 254-charcter segments. You can see example of how content can be chopped into such an array in the section discussing the HTML2Image() function. If the content is less the 254 characters, you can simply use it as that argument without converting it to an array.

 

CharacterSet: leave blank "" to use the default ("ISO-8859-1")
DisableECI
(Boolean): Use False, unless CharacterSet is "UTF-8" and reading fails
ErrorCorrectionLevel: "L" for Low (default), "M" - Medium, "Q" - Quartile, "H" – High
ImageWidth, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.
AddedMargin: set to -1 to remove the white margin (aka "quiet zone") around the barcode. Set to 0 to generate the default quiet zone around the barcode.
Note: removing the quiet zone may require a minimum Image Height & Width of about 134.

LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp,.jpg or .jpeg


The example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcodeQR({@TextContent}, "", False, "L", 112, 112, 0,  "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & "_QR.png")

Notes:

·         A QR Code can specify the full content of an email message. See link1 and link2.

uflBarcodePDF417() or uflBBarcodePDF417()


Arguments:
(TextContent(), CharacterSet, DisableECI, ErrorCorrectionLevel,

                             ImageWidth, ImageHeight, AddedMargin, Compact, Compaction,
                                       LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate a PDF-417 barcode image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent() divides the desired content into an array with 254-charcter segments. You can see example of how content can be chopped into such an array in the section discussing the HTML2Image() function. If the content is less the 254 characters, you can simply use it as that argument without converting it to an array.

 

CharacterSet: leave blank "" to use the default ("ISO-8859-1")
DisableECI
(Boolean): Use False, unless CharacterSet is "UTF-8" and reading fails
ErrorCorrectionLevel: "L0" to "L8" ("L2" is default)
ImageWidth, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.
AddedMargin: extra white margin in points. Typically, set to 0
Compact (Boolean): True or False
Compaction: "AUTO", "BYTE", "TEXT" or "NUMERIC". Default is "AUTO"
 
LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp, .jpg or .jpeg


The example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcodePDF417({@TextContent}, "", False, "L", 300, 124, 0, False, "", "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & "_PDF417.png")

Notes:

·         If height > width, the barcode is rendered vertically instead of horizontally.


 

uflBarcodeDataMatrix() or uflBBarcodeDataMatrix ()


Arguments:
(TextContent(), DefaultEncodation, Shape,

                                  ImageWidth, ImageHeight, LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate a Data Matrix barcode image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent() divides the desired content into an array with 254-charcter segments. You can see example of how content can be chopped into such an array in the section discussing the HTML2Image() function. If the content is less the 254 characters, you can simply use it as that argument without converting it to an array.

 

DefaultEncodation: leave blank "" or "ASCII", "Base256", "C40", "EDIFACT", "Text", "X12"
Shape: Leave blank "", or use "Rectangle" or "Square" to force the shape.
ImageWidth, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.

LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp,.jpg or .jpeg


The example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcodeDataMatrix({@TextContent}, "", "", 81, 81,  "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & "_QR.png")



 

uflBarcodeAztec() or uflBBarcodeAztec()


Arguments:
(TextContent(), Layers, ImageWidth, ImageHeight, LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate an Aztec barcode image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent() divides the desired content into an array with 254-charcter segments. You can see example of how content can be chopped into such an array in the section discussing the HTML2Image() function. If the content is less the 254 characters, you can simply use it as that argument without converting it to an array.

 

Layers: a number -- not Text! For most use cases, set the number to zero (0). This automatically sets the number of layers to the minimum required to render the content.
ImageWidth
, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.

LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp,.jpg or .jpeg


The example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcodeAztec ({@TextContent}, 0, 81, 81,  "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & "_Aztec.png")



 

uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()


Arguments:
(TextContent,ImageWidth, ImageHeight, ShowText, LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate a Code 39 barcode image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent is the desired content.


ImageWidth
, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.

ShowText: set to TRUE to display the text below the barcode.

LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp,.jpg or .jpeg


The Code 39 barcode shown in this example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcode39 (Ucase({Product_Type.Product Type Name}) & " 123", 300, 80, True, "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & "_Code39.png")
 

uflBarcode93() or uflBBarcode93()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcode128() or uflBBarcode128()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcodeITF() or uflBBarcodeITF()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcodeCodeBar() or uflBBarcodeCodeBar()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcodeMSI() or uflBBarcodeMSI()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcodePlessey() or uflBBarcodePlessey()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcode39() or uflBBarcode39()

 

uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()


Arguments: (TextContent,ImageWidth, ImageHeight, AddedMargin, ShowText, LocalFilePathName)

Barcode version returns "OK" or error message
BBarcode version is easier to use: it returns path to image of barcode or image of error.

This function allows you to generate a UPC-A barcode image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


TextContent is the desired content.


ImageWidth
, ImageHeight: size (height = width) of the image in points. 96 points = 1 inch.

AddedMargin: extra margin to add to the sides of the barcode

ShowText: set to TRUE to display the text below the barcode.

LocalFilePathName specified a unique file path & name of the barcode image file. That path & file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report. File extension must be .png, .bmp,.jpg or .jpeg


The Code 39 barcode shown in this example report image was generated with the following expression in the Graphic Location of the image object:

uFLBBarcodeUpcA ("01234567899", 300, 80, 0, True,  "c:\temp\" & "Test" & "_UpcA.png")

uflBarcodeUpcE() or uflBBarcodeUpcE()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()

 

uflBarcodeUpcEanExtension() or uflBBarcodeUpcEanExtension()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()

 

uflBarcodeITF() or uflBBarcodeITF()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()

 

uflBarcodeEAN8() or uflBBarcodeEAN8()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()

 

uflBarcodeEAN13() or uflBBarcodeEAN13()

Same instructions and arguments as uflBarcodeUpcA() or uflBBarcodeUpcA()

 

String/Text Manipulations

 

uflPopulateTemplate()

Arguments: (Template, ArgumentsArray, EmptyReplacement)

Returns: The result of substituting placeholders ({0}, {1}, {2), …) in the Template string with the corresponding entries in the ArgumentsArray. Null or empty arguments are replaced with the EmptyReplacement string.
If the result is longer than 510 characters: "Result is Longer than 510 characters"


Assume, for example, that you wish to build the syntax for an HTML table row with 3 elements: First Name, Last Name, and Middle Initial. The following formula:

    PopulateTemplate("<TR><TD>{0}</TD><TD>{1}</TD><TD>{2}</TD></TR>",
                                          ["Ido", "Millet", ""], "&nbsp;")

would return the following string:
<TR><TD>Ido</TD><TD>Millet</TD><TD>&nbsp;</TD></TR>

Note: instead of specifying an array of strings, you can pass in an array string variable.
For example:  PopulateTemplate("<TR><TD>{0}</TD><TD>{1}</TD><TD>{2}</TD></TR>",
                                          MyStringArrayVar, "&nbsp;")



uflExpandStringwithEnvironmentVar()

Arguments: (InputString)

Returns: The input string after expanding any references to environment variables within it to their dynamic values. 

 

For example, the following Crystal formula:

ExpandStringwithEnvironmentVar("%UserName% -> %temp%")
returns the following on my PC (where my user id is ixm7):
ixm7 -> C:\Users\ixm7\AppData\Local\Temp

uflReplaceAccentedChars()

Arguments: (String)

This function replaces all accented characters in the input string with their non-accented versions (for example, ê/ë/è/é à e).  Upper & lower case are preserved.


Returns: the converted string. 

 


 

uflHex2Ascii()

Arguments: (String)

This function takes hex string eg "ed0972ba628b29f0ec" and returns its ascii equivalent


Returns: the ascii string



uflHex2Number()

Arguments: (String)

This function takes hex string (for example "000130D") and returns its numeric value
(4877 in this case)


Returns: the numeric value of the hex string.



 

uflConvertRTF2Text()

Arguments: (RTFText() as String Array, SegmentN as integer)

This function converts RTF Text to Plain Text and returns the Nth 254-character segment from the result. See sample image.


RTFText argument divides the RTF string into an array with 254-charcter segments.
In the example below, the {@RTF} content gets chopped into a MyStringArray using the code in red.  The code in blue then calls uFLConvertRTF2Text(MyStringArray, i) in a loop until no more segments are returned.

Local StringVar array MyStringArray; IF Len({@RTF}) = 0 Then  (redim MyStringArray [1];  MyStringArray[1] = "";) Else ( Local numbervar segments := RoundUp(Len({@RTF})/254);  redim MyStringArray [segments];  Local numbervar index ;  for index := 0 to segments - 1 step 1 do   (MyStringArray[index + 1] := mid({@RTF}, 1 + (index * 254) , 254)) ; );  Local StringVar sResult; NumberVar i; i := 1; // Keep appending segments of 254 characters until we reach the end while uFLConvertRTF2Text(MyStringArray, i) <>"" Do ( sResult := sResult + uFLConvertRTF2Text(MyStringArray, i);  i := i + 1 ); sResult;


uflConvertRTFFileToText()

Arguments: (RTFFile, TextFile)

This function takes an RTF File and converts it to a plain text file.


Returns: “OK” or failure message (e.g. “RTF File not found”).

Regular Expressions

 

uflRegExpIsMatch()

Arguments: (strInput, Pattern)
This function takes an input string and matches it to Regular Expression pattern,

Returns: True if the input string matches the RegExp pattern.

For example, the following formula returns True because the string matches the RegExp pattern for valid emails:

uFLRegExpisMatch("ido@MilletSoftware.com",

  "[\w+-]+(?:\.[\w+-]+)*@[\w+-]+(?:\.[\w+-]+)*(?:\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})")
 

uflRegExpMatch()

Arguments: (strInput, Pattern)

Returns: This function searches the strInput and returns the first substring that matches the pattern.

For example, the following formula returns “ido@MilletSoftware.com” because it’s the first substring matching a valid email address pattern:

uFLRegExpMatch("His email address is ido@MilletSoftware.com.",
                         "[\w+-]+(?:\.[\w+-]+)*@[\w+-]+(?:\.[\w+-]+)*(?:\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4})")

 

 

uflRegExpReplace()

Arguments: (strInput, Pattern, Replacement)

Returns: This function searches the strInput and replace strings that match a pattern with a replacement string.

For example, the following formula returns
“His Social Security Number is ***-**-****”
because every digit was replaced with a ‘*’:

uFLRegExpReplace("His Social Security Number is 123-45-6789", "\d", "*")

File/ini/registry

 

uflFileAge()

Arguments: (FileName)
Returns:  Age of file in minutes.
                - 1 if the given file path & name doesn't exists.

uflFileCompare()

Arguments: (file1, file2)
Returns:  False if the 2 files are not the same (or are missing/inaccessible).
                Trues: if the content of the 2 files is the same.

uflFileCopy()

Arguments: (FileToCopy, DestinationFile)
Returns:  "OK", "File Not Found", "Destination File Already Exists", or error message.
Note: use FileExists()/FileDelete() to ensure the destination file doesn't already exist.

uflFileDelete ()

Arguments: (FileToDelete)
Returns:  "OK", "File Not Found", or Error message if the delete fails

uflFileExists()

Arguments: (FileName)
Returns:  If the given file path & name exists, returns TRUE.  Otherwise, returns FALSE.

uflFileRename()

Arguments: (FileToRename, NewName)
Returns:  "OK", "File Not Found" or Error message if rename fails.
Note: use FileExists()/FileDelete() to ensure the new file name doesn't already exist.

uflFileJustName()

Arguments: (FileName)
Returns:  file name without the path.

uflFileJustPath()

Arguments: (FileName)
Returns:  file path without the name.


 

uflFileAddText()

Arguments: (FileName, TextToAdd, DeleteFileBeforeAdd, CarriageReturnAfterAdd )
Returns:  TRUE if successful, otherwise FALSE.

 

Adds text to a given file (file path and name). 
If the file doesn’t exist it gets created automatically.

If the directory doesn’t exist, it gets created automatically.
Note: use CHR(34) in TextToAdd argument to generate double quotes in the text output.

If DeleteBeforeAdd is TRUE – deletes the file before appending the text.
Note: the deleted file is moved to the recycle bin where it can be recovered.

If CarriageReturnAfterAdd is set to FALSE, follow-up calls to this function would add content to the same line (allowing “wide” exports beyond the 254 character limitation of String variables). 

You can use the FileAddText() function to generate your own log or export files from within Crystal formulas.  

A specific example would be a situation where after using the functions below to electronically burst and e-mail customers their invoices, you want to update the database with information about which invoices were emailed.  You can write to a text file the invoice numbers that were included in the operation and use that file to update a Status column in the INVOICE table using an Update query (WHERE INVOICE_N IN the set of invoice

numbers…).

If the text you are writing is longer than 254 characters, break it to multiple calls like this:

 

StringVar MyText := {@LargeText};

StringVar TargetFile := "c:\temp\test.txt";

// chop and write the text in 254 character segments

While Len(MyText) > 254 Do

    (
    FileAddText (TargetFile, Left(MyText, 254), False, False);

    MyText := Mid(MyText, 255);

    );

// write the remaining small segment

FileAddText (TargetFile, MyText, False, False);




 

Here is an example of using FileAddText to write to a log file:

 

// The FileAddText() can be used to create any customized text logging/export 
// you can embed this functionality inside IF THEN logic to log information

// only when certain conditions in the report are met.


FileAddText(

// File to add text to

"c:\temp\My_Log.txt",

// Text added to the file

“Product Type: “ + {Product_Type.Product Type Name} + ", " + Cstr(CurrentDateTime), 

// FALSE = Don't delete this file before adding the text

FALSE,

// FALSE = Don't Add an Extra carriage return at the end of the added text

FALSE);




 

 

 

 

uflFileAddTextKey()

Arguments: (FileName, TextToAdd, DeleteFileBeforeAdd, CarriageReturnAfterAdd,
                      Key2AvoidDuplication )


Returns:
  TRUE if successful, otherwise FALSE.

Same as FileAddText above but requires a unique String value in Key2AvoidDuplication argument.  If that value was already used in a prior call within the same report preview, the process is skipped.  The idea is to avoid duplication in cases where report pagination causes the formula evaluation to be duplicated.

Note: FileAddTextKey() is just a convenient alternative to using a NewKey() test before calling FileAddText().




 

uflFileGetText()

Arguments: (FileName, Segment_N)
Note: the file name should include the full path to the file.

 

Returns: Breaking the file content into segments of 254 characters each, the function returns the segment number specified by the Segment_N argument.  If the specified file path & name doesn't exist, an empty string is returned. 

In Crystal, you can load the entire file content into a string variable using the following code:

StringVar sFile;

NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sFile string until

// we reach the end of the file

while FileGetText( "c:\temp\test.ini", i) <>"" Do

(

sFile := sFile + FileGetText( "c:\temp\test.ini", i);

i := i + 1

);

// Return the resulting string

sFile;

 


Note: if the file contains HTML or RTF text (rather than plain text) you can take advantage of Crystal's formatting options to interpret the string returned by the formula as HTML or RTF.  Also, be sure to use Crystal's "Can Grow" formatting option where appropriate.

 

uflFileGetTextUTF8()

 

            Same as FileGetText() except that it works with text files with UTF-8 encoding.  

uflFileListFromWildCards()

Arguments: (FileName(s), Delimiter, Segment_N, Recursive)

Notes:

·         the FileName argument can include one or more path and wild card patterns separated by the specified Delimiter. The second element in such a delimited list can drop the path if it uses the path of the element before it.  For example, c:\Mail\Attach\*.xls;*.pdf

·         If Recursive is set to True, the search process recourses down into subfolders

 

Returns: A delimited list of all files matching the specified FileName(s) patterns. Breaking the file list  content into segments of 254 characters each, the function returns the segment number specified by the Segment_N argument. 
If the specified file path & name doesn't exist, an empty string is returned. 

In Crystal, you can load the entire file list into a string variable using the following code:

StringVar sFile;

NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sFile string until

// we reach the end of the file List

while FileListFromWildCards("c:\mail\attach\*.xls;*.sav",";", i ,False )  <>"" Do

(

sFile := sFile + FileListFromWildCards("c:\mail\attach\*.xls;*.sav",";", i ,False );

i := i + 1

);

// Return the resulting string

sFile;

 

// to show each file on a new line, replace delimiter with NewLine + CarriageReturn.

//Replace(sFile, ";", Chr(10) + Chr(13));

 


To check for the existence of files matching a wild card expression, you can use a Crystal formula like this:
IF Len(FileListFromWildCards("c:\temp\*.zip", ",", 1, False)) > 0 Then True Else False

 


 

uflFileUnzip()

Arguments: (FileToUnzip, DestinationFolder, Password, Type, Options)
Returns:  "OK", "File Not Found", "ZIP Open Problem", "Password Problem" or error message.

If the DestinationFolder doesn't exist, the function takes care of creating it.
Password
argument is optional.  Set it to "" if the zip file is not password protected.
Set the Type argument to "ZIP" (though currently it is assumed to be that)
Leave the Options argument as "" (it is reserved for future enhancements).

Example without password:
uFLFileUnzip("c:\temp\test.zip", "c:\temp\", "", "ZIP", "");


Example with password:
uFLFileUnzip("c:\temp\test_Pass.zip", "c:\temp\", "abc123", "ZIP", "");




uflGetTempFolder()

Arguments: None

Returns:  The path to the user's temp folder (without a closing "\")

 

uflGetINIValue()

Arguments: (FileName, SectionName, KeyName)

Returns:  The String value found in the ini file, under the given section for the specified key.  Returns “Failed INI Lookup” if the lookup fails. 


uflSetINIValue()

Arguments: (FileName, SectionName, KeyName, KeyValue)

Returns:  TRUE if Successful – FALSE if failed. 

Writes the String value specified in "KeyValue" to the specified ini file, Section, and Key. If the path exists but the ini file doesn't – the function creates the ini file.  If the section and/or key don't exist, they get created.


uflGetRegistryString()

Arguments: (Branch, Key_Name, Value_Name, Default)

Returns: The registry string value if it was found.  If the registry value could not be found, the Default value is returned. 

 

Note: possible Branch values are:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT

HKEY_CURRENT_USER

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE

HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG

HKEY_USERS

 

For example, the following Crystal formula:

GetRegistryString ("HKEY_CURRENT_USER",
                                 "Environment", "Temp", "Not Found")

returns the following value on my PC:
%USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Temp


uflLookupText()


Arguments:
(FileName, String2Match, ExactMatch)

The file name should include the full path to a text file with Key|||Value pairs like this:

Key1|||Value1
Key2|||Value2


Returns: the Value from the first line where the Key matches the Strings2Match argument.

ExactMatch is a Boolean argument: if it is True, the Key must match the String2Match on all characters (though the matching is not case sensitive).  If ExactMatch is False, the process assumes a match if the key is found anywhere within the String2Match.

This function can be used to let end users maintain branching logic for a string formula without needing to change the formula within Crystal.

GMT/Local and Time-Related

 

uflGMTtoLocalMinutes()

Arguments: None

Returns: The a String providing the number of minutes between Local and Universal (GMT) time, taking into consideration Daylight Saving Time periods and the PC time zone setup. If the function fails to find the value, it returns "Failed"

 

For example, on my PC (Eastern Standard Time) GMTtoLocalMinutes() returns "240" or "300" depending on Daylight Saving Time.

 

uflGMTtoLocal()

Arguments: (GMTEpoch)

Returns:  Local time as Epoch (number of seconds since 1970/01/01).
taking into consideration Daylight Saving Time periods and the PC time zone setup.

 

Web log files and databases frequently store DateTime information as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) or Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).  In your Crystal reports, you may need to display this DateTime information as Local Time. 

 

Since UFL’s don’t support DateTime arguments, this function requires that you pass the GMT DateTime argument as Epoch (number of seconds since 1970/01/01).  Assuming you have a GMT DateTime field called {GMTDateTime} you can convert it to Epoch using this formula:
DateDiff("s", datetime(1970,01,01), {GMTDateTime})

 

The function returns the Local Time as Epoch as well.  Assuming the Formula returning the Local Time as Epoch is called {@LocalTimeEpoch} you can convert the Local Time result back to DateTime format using the following formula:
DateAdd("s", {@LocalTimeEpoch} , datetime(1970,01,01))

You can combine the conversion steps into a single formula such as:
DateAdd("s",
GMTtoLocal(DateDiff("s", datetime(1970,01,01), {GMTDateTime}) ) , datetime(1970,01,01))

 

Evaluating Report Processing Elapsed Time

 

Since Crystal evaluates CurrentDateTime only once for each report, you can’t evaluate the time it took a report to process using Crystal functions. 

If you pass a zero (or a negative number) to the GMTToLocal() function, it returns the current system date & time.  This is useful for timing report processing.

 

Place the following formula in the report header to capture the start time:
   WhilePrintingRecords;

   DateTimeVar ldt_start;

   ldt_start := DateAdd("s", GMTtoLocal(0), datetime(1970,01,01));


And place the following formula in the report footer to display the elapsed time:
   WhilePrintingRecords;

   DateTimeVar ldt_start;

   DateDiff("s", ldt_start, DateAdd("s", GMTtoLocal(0), datetime(1970,01,01)));


 

uflGMTtoZone()

Arguments: (GMTEpoch, ToZone)

Returns:  Specified zone’s time as Epoch (number of seconds since 1970/01/01).

This function is very similar to the GMTtoLocal() function described above except that instead of automatically detecting the local time zone on the user’s PC, it converts the specified GMT/UTC time to time at the specified time zone.

Possible values for the ToZone argument are:

 

Time Zone Name

Offset

 

Time Zone Name

Offset

Tonga Standard Time

GMT+13:00

 

E. Africa Standard Time

GMT+03:00

New Zealand Standard Time

GMT+12:00

 

GTB Standard Time

GMT+02:00

Fiji Standard Time

GMT+12:00

 

E. Europe Standard Time

GMT+02:00

Central Pacific Standard Time

GMT+11:00

 

Egypt Standard Time

GMT+02:00

E. Australia Standard Time

GMT+10:00

 

South Africa Standard Time

GMT+02:00

AUS Eastern Standard Time

GMT+10:00

 

FLE Standard Time

GMT+02:00

West Pacific Standard Time

GMT+10:00

 

Israel Standard Time

GMT+02:00

Tasmania Standard Time

GMT+10:00

 

W. Europe Standard Time

GMT+01:00

Vladivostok Standard Time

GMT+10:00

 

Central Europe Standard Time

GMT+01:00

Cen. Australia Standard Time

GMT+09:30

 

Romance Standard Time

GMT+01:00

AUS Central Standard Time

GMT+09:30

 

Central European Standard Time

GMT+01:00

Tokyo Standard Time

GMT+09:00

 

W. Central Africa Standard Time

GMT+01:00

Korea Standard Time

GMT+09:00

 

GMT Standard Time

GMT

Yakutsk Standard Time

GMT+09:00

 

Azores Standard Time

GMT-01:00

China Standard Time

GMT+08:00

 

Cape Verde Standard Time

GMT-01:00

North Asia East Standard Time

GMT+08:00

 

Mid-Atlantic Standard Time

GMT-02:00

Singapore Standard Time

GMT+08:00

 

E. South America Standard Time

GMT-03:00

W. Australia Standard Time

GMT+08:00

 

SA Eastern Standard Time

GMT-03:00

Taipei Standard Time

GMT+08:00

 

Greenland Standard Time

GMT-03:00

SE Asia Standard Time

GMT+07:00

 

Newfoundland Standard Time

GMT-03:30

North Asia Standard Time

GMT+07:00

 

Atlantic Standard Time

GMT-04:00

Myanmar Standard Time

GMT+06:30

 

SA Western Standard Time

GMT-04:00

N. Central Asia Standard Time

GMT+06:00

 

Pacific SA Standard Time

GMT-04:00

Central Asia Standard Time

GMT+06:00

 

SA Pacific Standard Time

GMT-05:00

Sri Lanka Standard Time

GMT+06:00

 

Eastern Standard Time

GMT-05:00

Nepal Standard Time

GMT+05:45

 

Central America Standard Time

GMT-06:00

India Standard Time

GMT+05:30

 

Central Standard Time

GMT-06:00

Ekaterinburg Standard Time

GMT+05:00

 

Mexico Standard Time

GMT-06:00

West Asia Standard Time

GMT+05:00

 

Canada Central Standard Time

GMT-06:00

Afghanistan Standard Time

GMT+04:30

 

Mountain Standard Time

GMT-07:00

Arabian Standard Time

GMT+04:00

 

Pacific Standard Time

GMT-08:00

Caucasus Standard Time

GMT+04:00

 

Alaskan Standard Time

GMT-09:00

Iran Standard Time

GMT+03:30

 

Hawaiian Standard Time

GMT-10:00

Arabic Standard Time

GMT+03:00

 

Samoa Standard Time

GMT-11:00

Arab Standard Time

GMT+03:00

 

Dateline Standard Time

GMT-12:00

Russian Standard Time

GMT+03:00

 

 

 


Note:
GMTtoZone() properly handles Daylight Saving Time periods at the specified zone.

 

uflSecondsToTimeString()

Arguments: (Seconds, Format)

Returns: seconds converted to a time string formatted according to the format argument.


For example,
uflSecondsToTimeString(3800, "HH:mm")   returns "01:03"
uflSecondsToTimeString(3800, "HH:mm:ss")   returns "01:03:20"

Note: use HH rather than hh in the time string in order to avoid cases where 0 hours is formatted as 12 hours.


uflTimeStringToSeconds()

Arguments: (TimeString, formatted as hh:mm:ss)

Returns: time string converted to seconds.


For example,
uflTimeStringToSeconds("01:03:20") returns 3,800.00


 

 


 

Message/Input Boxes

 

uflMessageBoxOK()

Arguments: (Message, Title)

This function triggers a message box with an OK button. 

Returns: Ignore the return value


A typical scenario for using this functionality is to display a message in a runtime environment that doesn't support Crystal Report alerts. 

For example, the following Crystal formula:
IF Sum ({Purchase.Net})> 100000 THEN MessageBoxOK("Net Amount Is Greater than $100,000" & Chr(10) &  Chr(13) & "Please Contact the Authorities!"", "Alert: Net Amount is Too Big")

Triggers a message box if the grand total of the Net amount is more than 100,000.

uflMessageBoxYesNo()

Arguments: (Message, Title)

This function triggers a message box with a YES and NO buttons. 

Returns:
1 if the user clicked YES and
0 if the user clicked "NO"  

 

A typical scenario for using this functionality is to condition further processing in the report on a user response, but only in specific situations (a regular parameter would prompt the user under all conditions). 

For example, the following Crystal formula:
IF Sum ({Purchase.Net})> 100000 AND MessageBoxYesNo("Do you wish to email an alert to the appropriate manager?", "Alert: Net Amount is Too Big")=1 THEN

(

// the following code block would have detailed information causing an email to be triggered

EmailSet(…);

EmailAdd(…);

EmailSend;

);

Triggers an email message if the grand total of the Net amount is more than 100,000 and the user responded positively to the message box.

 


uflInputBox()

Arguments: (Prompt, Title, DefaultText)

This function triggers an Input Box allowing the user to enter text. 

Returns:
Blank text if the user clicks Cancel
The user-entered text (up to 254 characters) if the user clicks OK  

 

A typical scenario for using this functionality is to add comments to areas in the report that show exceptional (good/bad) performance.  This is something that standard report parameters cannot do because:
a) parameters always get triggered while InputBox() can be conditionally triggered, and
b) parameters return fixed values, while InputBox() can be triggered multiple times (for example, once for each record or group with an exceptional value). 

For example, the following Crystal formula:
IF {@L1_Returns}> 0.15 THEN

InputBox({Product_Type.Product Type Name} & " has high % Returns." & chr(13) & "Please explain.", "High % Returns for " & {Product_Type.Product Type Name},

"% Returns for " & {Product_Type.Product Type Name} & " is high because ");

Triggers the following Input Box:

image

 

 


uflInputBox2Command()

Arguments: (Prompt, Title, DefaultText, ExePath, CommandLine1, CommandLine2, CommandLine3, DebugWindow)

This function and the first 4 arguments behaves just like the InputBox function (described above).  However, it is used to trigger another executable (just like the ExeRun function described above) and insert the user's input into the command line passed to the executable. 

The 3 command line arguments allow you to construct a command line that is longer than 254 characters (the function simply combines the 3 arguments into a single command line.  The DebugWindow argument (True or False) allows you to request a display of the resulting command line (useful for debugging purposes).

Returns:

Error message if the ExePath doesn't find an exe file in the specified location.
"No Input - Processing Skipped" if the user clicks Cancel or input was blank.
The user-entered text (up to 254 characters) if the user clicks OK  

 

A possible scenario for using this functionality is to trigger printing of information on the report via a call to DataLink Viewer and another report, passing the product name as a parameter and the number of copies as an Input from the user. 

For example, the following Crystal formula (placed in a Group Footer for Product Type):

InputBox2Command("The Revenue for: " & {Product_Type.Product Type Name}

& " is: " & Sum ({@value}, {Product_Type.Product Type Name}) & Chr(10) &

"Volume was: " & Sum({Orders_Detail.Quantity}, {Product_Type.Product Type Name}) & Chr(10) & chr(10) & "Please Specify How Many Printouts:",
"Print Report for " & {Product_Type.Product Type Name},  "1",

"C:\Program Files\DataLink Viewer 9\DataLink_Viewer_9.exe",

"-v ""C:\Program Files\DataLink Viewer 9\Product Type Catalog V9.rpt"" ""Parm1:" + {Product_Type.Product Type Name} + """",

" ""Printer:Default"" ""Print_Copies:{%Input}""", "", False);

 

Would prompt the user with the following dialog:


image

 

It would then replace the {%Input} token in the command line with the value provided by the user, so DataLink Viewer would print the information for that Product Type with the specified number of copies.


 

Web/HTML/Google

 

uflHTMLfile2RTFfile()


Arguments:
(HTMLfile, RTFfile)

This function converts an HTML file (the 1st argument) to an RTF file (the 2nd argument). 

Returns:
"OK" or "Failed"

 

Since Crystal's support for RTF is more advanced than its support for HTML, a typical scenario for using this functionality is to display HTML files by converting them to RTF and using RTF rather than HTML interpretation for the formula. 

For example, the following Crystal formula takes the CUT_Light.htm file, converts it to CUT_Light.rtf, and then uses the FileGetText() function to bring in the resulting RTF text.


HTMLfile2RTFFile ("c:\temp\CUT_Light.htm", "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf");

 

StringVar sFile;

NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sFile string until done

while FileGetText( "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf", i) <>"" Do

    (sFile := sFile + FileGetText( "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf", i);

i := i + 1);

// Return the resulting string

sFile;

 

The left display is HTML with a numbered list shown as RTF in Crystal.
The right display is the original HTML shown as HTML in Crystal. 
image
Note that some aspects of the formatting are lost in the Crystal HTML interpretation:


For a description of RTF rendering limitations in Crystal Reports, see:

SAP Note 1214798 - What RTF tags are supported in Crystal Reports?

For a description of HTML rendering limitations in Crystal Reports, see:
SAP Note 1217084 - What are the supported HTML tags and attributes with HTML Text Interpretation?


uflHTMLstring2RTFFile()

Arguments: (HTMLstring, RTFFile)

This function converts an HTML string (the 1st argument) to an RTF file (the 2nd argument). 

Returns:
"OK" or "Failed"

 

Since Crystal's support for RTF is more advanced than its support for HTML, a typical scenario for using this functionality is to display HTML string (stored in a database column) by converting it to RTF and using RTF rather than HTML interpretation for the formula. 

For example, the following Crystal formula takes the html string in {Customer.Comments}, converts it to CUT_Light.rtf, and then uses the FileGetText() function to bring in the resulting RTF text.


HTMLstring2RTFFile ({Customer.Comments}, "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf");

 

StringVar sFile;

NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sFile string until done

while uflFileGetTextutf8( "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf", i) <>"" Do

    (sFile := sFile + uflFileGetTextutf8( "c:\temp\CUT_Light.rtf", i);

i := i + 1);

// Return the resulting string

sFile;
  

 

 

The left display is HTML with a numbered list shown as RTF in Crystal.
The right display is the original HTML shown as HTML in Crystal. 
image
Note that some aspects of the formatting are lost in the Crystal HTML interpretation:


For a description of RTF rendering limitations in Crystal Reports, see:

http://support.businessobjects.com/library/kbase/articles/c2011504.asp

 

For a description of HTML RTF rendering limitations in Crystal Reports, see:
http://support.businessobjects.com/library/kbase/articles/c2014842.asp


uflHTMLString2Txtfile()


Arguments:
(HTMLString, Txtfile)

This function converts an HTML string (the 1st argument) to a Text file (the 2nd argument). 

Returns:
"OK" or "Failed"

 

To support cases where the HTML string is longer than 254 characters, if the TxtFile argument is left out, the call simply appends the specified content to an internal variable. If the call specified the TxtFile argument, the resulting variable is also written to the specified text file (and the internal variable is then reset).

This allows you to convert a large HTML string to plain text.

For example, the following Crystal formula takes a large HTML string, converts it to a text file, and then uses the FileGetText() function to bring in the resulting text file.

--------------------------------------
NumberVar i;

StringVar HTMLString;

HTMLString := {@HTML_String};

 

//append the content to a global internal variable but don't yet write to a text File

While Len(HTMLString) > 254 Do

    ( HTMLstring2TxtFile(Left(HTMLString, 254), "");

    HTMLString := Mid(HTMLString, 255);

    i := i + 1 );

// Append to the string variable and write to the Text file
HTMLstring2TxtFile(HTMLString, "c:\temp\HTMLasText.txt");

 

// -- Get the Text File Content

StringVar sFile;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sFile string until done

while FileGetText( "c:\temp\HTMLasText.txt", i) <>"" Do

    (sFile := sFile + FileGetText( "c:\temp\HTMLasText.txt", i);

      i := i + 1);

// Return the resulting string

sFile;
--------------------------------------

 

uflhttpFileExists()

Arguments: (File URL)

This function checks if a specified file exists on the web.   

Returns a String:
"No Response from Web Site"     if the web site didn’t respond
"TRUE"                                         if the file exists
"FALSE"                                       if the file doesn’t exist

 

 

Note: you may specify the path to the file in various ways:


Without http://
httpFileExists(“www.MilletSoftware.com/Download/MyFile.zip”)

 

With http://

httpFileExists(“http://www.MilletSoftware.com/Download/MyFile.zip”)

 

As FTP location
httpFileExists(“ftp://ftp.cac.psu.edu/pub/thesis-packages/win/PsuThesiFull.exe”)

 

uflhttpExists()

Arguments: (File URL)

This function checks if a specified url exists.   

Returns a String:
"TRUE"                                         if the url exists and is accessible
"FALSE" or error message            otherwise

Note: this function treats a redirect as failure to access the original URL

 


  


 

uflhttpFileDownload()

Arguments: (File URL, LocalFilePathName)

This function download a file on the web to a specified local file path and name.   

Returns a String:
Error message        if the download process failed
OK                        if the download succeeded

 

Note: you may specify the path to the web file in various ways, as described in httpFileExists above.

 

uflhttpFileDownloadRename()

Arguments: (File URL, LocalFilePathName, RenameToServerFileName)

This function is useful when
a) the remote file name is unknown (the url responds with a download of an unknown file)

In that case, use a temp file name in the 2nd argument, and set the 3rd argument to TRUE
- or -

b) when you wish to download a known file name to a different file name
In that case, set the 3rd argument to FALSE

Returns a String:
Error message                    if the download process failed
Remote File Name           if the download succeeded

 

Note: you may specify the path to the web file in various ways, as described in httpFileExists above.

 


 

uflhttpToImage()

Arguments: (URL, LocalFilePathName, ImageType, ImageWidth, Wait4Load)

URL: can be specified in 3 ways (web url, file:///, or simple file path). Examples:


web url, png output, width = 955 pixels, and Wait4Load set to 1500 milliseconds:

uflhttpToImage('http://apbreports.com/dashboards/demo/dashboard-cards/demoo.html',

'C:\temp\dash.png','PNG', 955, 1500);
Result is this image.


file:/// url example, JPG output, width = 1045 pixels, zero Wait4Load:
uflhttpToImage('file:///C:/TEMP/Revenue_Pivot.htm','C:\temp\Revenue_Pivot.JPG',

'JPG', 1045, 0);
Result is this image.


Simple file path  (same as above; CUT Light takes care of converting to file:///):
uflhttpToImage('C:\TEMP\Revenue_Pivot.htm','C:\temp\Revenue_Pivot.JPG',

'JPG', 1045, 0);


LocalFilePathName: the path and name for the generated image file.


ImageType
can be "BPM", "JPG", or "PNG"


ImageWidth allows you to control the width of the browser page (in pixels) used to render the HTML content before it gets converted to an image. Responsive layout or HTML elements specified as percent of web page width would adapt to that width. 
Set to zero (0) to ignore.

Wait4Load specifies waiting time in milliseconds, allowing the web page to fully load before being captured as image. Set to zero (0) to ignore. For one use case where the web page had animation and multiple Javascript widgets, a value of 1500 worked well.
 

Use this function to download a web page as an image file. You can then bring the image into the report via dynamic reference to image path.


Returns a String:
"Invalid URL"                  if the url doesn't exist or gets redirected
Error message                    if the process failed
"OK"                               Otherwise

 

 


 

uflHTML2Image()

Arguments: (HTML(), LocalFilePathName, ImageType, ImageWidth)

Returns a String:

Error message                    if the process failed
OK                                    Otherwise

This function overcomes limitations with how Crystal interprets HTML. Instead, it converts the HTML to an image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).


LocalFilePathName specified the file path and name of the image file. Typically, the same path and file name is then used to set the dynamic Graphic Location path to load the image into the Crystal report.


ImageType
can be "BPM", "JPG", or "PNG"

ImageWidth
allows you to control the width (in pixels) of the browser page used to render the HTML content before it gets converted to an image. HTML elements specified as percent of web page width would adapt to that width. Set to zero (0) to ignore.

HTML() argument divides the HTML string into an array with 254-charcter segments.
In the example below, the HTML_Table string gets chopped into such an array using the code in red.  

// Note: Content of HTML Table is established by other formulas Stringvar HTML_Table ; // Convert the HTML to an array with 254-character text segments local stringvar array MyStringArray; IF Len(HTML_Table) = 0 Then  (redim MyStringArray [1];  MyStringArray[1] = "";) Else ( Local numbervar segments := RoundUp(Len(HTML_Table)/254);  redim MyStringArray [segments];  Local numbervar index ;  for index := 0 to segments - 1 step 1 do   (MyStringArray[index + 1] := mid(HTML_Table, 1 + (index * 254) , 254)) ; );  uFLHTML2Image(MyStringArray, "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & ".bmp", "BMP", 400) ;  "c:\temp\" & {@ProductType} & ".bmp" ; // Graphic Location set to the resulting image file


 

uflhttpCallServiceGetTokens()

Arguments: (URL, Tokens)

Calls a web service, such as SMS, passing argument values in the url. The Tokens argument (containing the names of the tokens separated by '||' allows the function to return the values of those tokens found in the XML returned from the web service.


Returns a '||' delimited string with the values of the named tokens
or Error message if failed

Example, for triggering a message via an SMS service: uFLhttpCallServiceGetTokens("https://sveve.no/SMS/SendMessage?user=user1&passwd=shh&from=TK-Helpdesk&reply=false&to=94271234&msg=Test%20of%20uflhttpCallServiceGetTokens()",

"msg_ok_count||id" 
This call (if dummy password and phone number are replaced with real values) returns: 1||5554836
where 1 is the count of successful messages, and 5554836 is the id.


 

uflGoogleTranslate()

Arguments: (sourceText(), sourceLanguage, targetLanguage, Segment_N)
Returns a String:
Error message (starting with ***) if the process failed
The Nth segment of the translated text otherwise

This function allows you to translate any amount of text using the paid ($20 for 1 million characters) Google Translate service. This service supports more than 100 languages.
To enable the service, you need to follow Google's Instructions to create a cloud project, enable billing, and get your API Key. You then need to set an entry in CUT_Light_Options.ini. For the 32-bit version of CUT Light, create that file here:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Millet Software\CUT_Light_NET_32\CUT_Light_Options.ini
The entry should look like this (use your own API key of course):
-----------
[Options]
GoogleAPI_TranslateKey=AIzaSyC4C22Af4XQ…
No_Change=Millet Software||Cool||DataLink Viewer||Visual CUT
-----------
The No_Change entry in the ini file above indicates what text elements should be exempt from translation.

sourceText() divides the text you wish to translate into an array with 254-charcter segments. You can see example of how content can be chopped into such an array in the section discussing the HTML2Image() function.
As shown in the example below, if the content is less the 254 characters, you can simply use it as that argument without converting it to an array.


See example showing English text (in black) translated to Spanish (in blue), using the following formula:
---------------------

Local StringVar sResult;

Local StringVar sSegment;

Local NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sResult string until reaching the end

sSegment := uFLGoogleTraslate({Instructions.Description}, "English", "Spanish", i );

while sSegment <>"" AND Left(sSegment,3) <> "***" DO

(

sResult := sResult + sSegment;

i := i + 1;

sSegment := uFLGoogleTraslate({Instructions.Description}, "English", "Spanish", i );

);

// Return the resulting string

sResult;
---------------------



 

uflIpDot2Long()

Arguments: (String)

Converts IP address such as "192.168.1.2" to its numeric value (3232235778)


uflIpLong2Dot()

Arguments: (Number)

Converts IP address number such as 3232235778 to its dot notation ("192.168.1.2")

 

image

SQL

 

uflExecuteSQLCanConnect()


Arguments:
(ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String, User ID, Password)

This function tests whether a connection can be made to a database: an ODBC DSN (even one that is not used by the Crystal report) or any OLEDB Connection String.

You may use such a test before calling other ExecuteSQL statements.

 

Returns:
"TRUE" or an error message if connection to the database failed.

 

Note: you may refer to a saved encrypted password by its name if you also own Visual CUT and you copy the entry from the DataLink_Viewer.ini file to the CUT_Light.ini file like this:

[Options]
Encrypted_Password_DB=64D26BF23E2C830AE2BE0A8EAC689353159D5618ED8D5D45


 

uflExecuteSQLNoReturn()


Arguments:
(ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String,
                             User ID, Password, sql1, sql2, sql3, sql4, sql5)

This function executes a SQL statement against any ODBC DSN (even one that is not used by the Crystal report) or any OLEDB Connection String. If the SQL statement is longer than 254 characters, break it into segments across up to 5 sql "segments". 

The idea is to Update, Delete, or Insert records as a byproduct of viewing a Crystal report.

 

Returns:
"OK" or an error message if failed.


If the sql statement is not properly constructed (e.g., missing single or double quotes) you may get a "Memory Full" message from Crystal.  In such a case, examine and adjust the sql statement.

 

If you email me a request for a sample report, I will email you an rpt file that demonstrates this functionality.  Below are two formulas from that report as examples you can follow:

The formula increments the "Last Year's Sales" column in the Customer table by $1:

ExecuteSQLNoReturn ("Xtreme Sample Database","","","Update ""Customer"" SET ""Last Year's Sales"" = ""Last Year's Sales"" + 1 WHERE TRUE" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" )

 

This formula sets Customer 7 Address2 column to its Last Year's Sales:

ExecuteSQLNoReturn ("Xtreme Sample Database","","","Update ""Customer"" SET ""Address2"" = ""Last Year's Sales"" WHERE ""Customer ID"" = 7" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" )

 

This formula demonstrates using information from the current section in the report:

whileprintingrecords;

ExecuteSQLNoReturn ("Vision Offline","SYSDBA","sesame","Update ENTRY SET PRINTED =1 WHERE ENTRY_ID =" + cstr({ENTRY.ENTRY_ID},0,'') ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" )

 

Embedding File(s) Content in the SQL Statement

If you need to trigger a large SQL script, you can embed within any of the sql segments references to files using the following token structure:  [[Insert_File:File_Path_and_Name]]
For example, [[Insert_File:c:\temp\Script1.txt]]

Such tokens are replaced with the content of the specified files (if such files exists). You can use as many file tokens as you wish. If an inserted file has embedded file tokens, they would be replaced as well (the process is recursive).


Avoiding Duplicate Processing (old approach)

 

Since Crystal may evaluate the same formula multiple times, as it renders the page content (particularly when Keep Together properties cause shifting of page content from one page to another), the SQL statements may fire more than once.  This can be a problem in cases where an Update statement is incrementing a value. 

To guard against duplicate processing, you can leverage CUT Light’s ability to read and write ini file values. Here is an example:

If GetIniValue("c:\cutlight.ini","PickTicket.rpt",
                        {TKT_HDR.TKT_NO})="Failed INI Lookup"

Or

DateDiff ("s",
          CDateTime(GetIniValue("c:\cutlight.ini","PickTicket.rpt",
            {TKT_HDR.TKT_NO})), CurrentDateTime)>10

then

(

ExecuteSQLNoReturn ("ODBC1","","","Update DB1.dbo.TKT_HDR SET DB1.dbo.TKT_HDR.TIMES_PRTD = DB1.dbo.PS_TKT_HDR.TIMES_PRTD + 1 WHERE DB1.dbo.TKT_HDR.TKT_NO = '"+{TKT_HDR.TKT_NO}+"'" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" );

SetIniValue("c:\cutlight.ini","PickTicket.rpt",{TKT_HDR.TKT_NO},
       ToText(CurrentDateTime))

)


This formula starts by checking that a value for that particular record (ticket number) hasn’t yet been written to the ini file or, if it has, it hasn’t happened within the last 10 seconds.  If that condition is satisfied, the formula then proceeds to execute the Update statenment and record the execution time for that particular ticket in the ini file. 

 

Note: you may refer to a saved encrypted password by its name. See information about this in the ExecuteSQLCanConnect()section.

uflExecuteSQLReturnValue()


Arguments:
(ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String,
                         User ID, Password, sql1, sql2, sql3, sql4, sql5)

This function executes a SQL statement against any ODBC DSN (even one that is not used by the Crystal report) or any OLEDB Connection String. If the SQL statement is longer than 254 characters, break it into segments across up to 5 sql "segments". 

The SQL statement must be of a type that returns a single value rather than a result set. 

A typical use is to look up or get information from a data source that is not included in the report.


Returns:
A string containing the result, or an error message if failed. You must guard against Null return values by first checking for count or by using an aggregate (Min, Avg, Max…)  


If the sql statement is not properly constructed (e.g., missing single or double quotes) you may get a "Memory Full" message from Crystal.  In such a case, examine and adjust the sql statement.

 

If you email me a request for a sample report, I will email you an rpt file that demonstrates this functionality.  Below is a formula from that report as an example you can follow:

The formula returns the number of employees in the EMPLOYEE table (even if that table or even the ODBC data source is not included in the report:

ExecuteSQLReturnValue ("Xtreme Sample Database","","","Select Count(*) from Employee","","","","")

 

Here's another example:

ExecuteSQLReturnValue ("Xtreme Sample Database 11","","", "SELECT sum(A.""Order Amount"") from Orders A WHERE A.""Customer ID"" = " + Cstr({Orders.Customer ID},0,""),"","" ,"","")

 

Here's an example that combines both types of SQL Functions:

WhilePrintingRecords;

IF ExecuteSQLReturnValue ("Vision Offline","SYSDBA","myPass","Select PRINTED from ENTRY WHERE ENTRY_ID ="+cstr({ENTRY.ENTRY_ID},0,'') ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" ) ="0"

 

THEN

ExecuteSQLNoReturn ("Vision Offline","SYSDBA","myPass","Update ENTRY SET PRINTED = 1 WHERE ENTRY_ID ="+cstr({ENTRY.ENTRY_ID},0,'') ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" )

 

Example with a Connection String

 

Here's an example where instead of ODBC DSN, a connection string is specified:

ExecuteSQLReturnValue ("Provider=sqloledb;Data Source=IP ADDRESS,1433;Network Library=DBMSSOCN;Initial Catalog=DB_NAME;","USER","PASSWORD","Select Count(*) from Location","","","",""))

 

 

 

uflExecuteSQLReturnFile()

 

Arguments: (ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String, 

                         User ID, Password, 

                         FilePathAndName, ConversionType
                             sql1, sql2, sql3, sql4, sql5)

 

This function is similar to ExecuteSQLReturnValue() except for 2 aspects:

 

1.      Instead of returning a value from the database to the report, the function saves the value To a file specified by the FilePathAndName argument.

 

2.  The content is converted according to the ConversionType argument.  
     Supported options are:

None or "" (no conversion)

RTF2Text (convert RTF content to plain text)

2BMP, 2PNG, 2GIF, or 2JPEG  convert any image type to
                                                                                     bitmap, png, GIF, or  jpeg
2BMP_White converts image with transparent background
                                                             to BMP with white background

 

Returns: 

"OK" or a failure message.

 

Note: you can bring the converted/saved content into the report using the FileGetText(), or FileGetTextUTF8() functions. In the case of image files, they can be brought into the report via dynamic reference to image path.


 

uflExecuteSQLReturnDelimited()


Arguments:
(ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String,
                           User ID, Password, Delimiter, sql1, sql2, sql3, sql4, sql5)

This function executes a SQL statement against any ODBC DSN (even one that is not used by the Crystal report) or any OLEDB Connection String. If the SQL statement is longer than 254 characters, break it into segments across up to 5 sql "segments". 

The SQL statement can be of a type that returns multiple records. The function takes all the values in the first column of the result set and concatenates them into a single delimited string.  


Returns:
A string containing the result, or an error message if failed. 


If the sql statement is not properly constructed (e.g., missing brackets, single or double quotes) you may get a "Memory Full" message from Crystal.  In such a case, examine and adjust the sql statement.

 

If you email me a request for a sample report, I will email you an rpt file that demonstrates this functionality.  Below is a formula from that report as an example you can follow:

The formula returns the last names of all employees delimited with a semi-colon (";") from the EMPLOYEE table in the Xtreme Sample Database (even if that table or even the ODBC data source is not included in the report:

ExecuteSQLReturnDelimited ("Xtreme Sample Database","","",";", "Select [Last Name] from Employee" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"" )

 

The result is:

Davolio;Fuller;Leverling;Peacock;Buchanan;Suyama;King;Callahan;Dodsworth;Hellstern;
Smith;Patterson;Brid;Martin

 

Note: you may refer to a saved encrypted password by its name. See information about this in the ExecuteSQLCanConnect() section.


uflExecuteSQLReturnDelimitedSegment()


Arguments:
(ODBC DSN or OLEDB Connection String,
                         User ID, Password, Delimiter, sql1, sql2, sql3, sql4, sql5, SegmentN)

This function executes a SQL statement against any ODBC DSN (even one that is not used by the Crystal report) or any OLEDB Connection String. If the SQL statement is longer than 254 characters, break it into segments across up to 5 sql "segments". 

The SQL statement can be of a type that returns multiple records. The function takes all the values in the first column of the result set and concatenates them into a single delimited string.  

 

This function is just like ExecuteSQLReturnDelimited() (see detail in prior page), except that it allows you to retrieve strings that are longer than 254 characters by breaking the operation into segments.


Returns:
Breaking the resulting string into segments of 254 characters each, the function returns the segment number specified by the Segment_N argument.  In Crystal, you can load the entire result into a string variable using the following code:

WhilePrintingRecords;

StringVar sResult;

StringVar sSegment;

NumberVar i;

i := 1;

// Keep appending segments of 254 characters to the sResult string until reaching the end

sSegment := ExecuteSQLReturnDelimitedSegment ("Xtreme Sample Database","","", Chr(10) + chr(13), "Select [Customer Name] from Customer" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"", i );

while sSegment <>"" Do

(

sResult := sResult + sSegment;

i := i + 1;

sSegment := ExecuteSQLReturnDelimitedSegment ("Xtreme Sample Database","","", Chr(10) + chr(13), "Select [Customer Name] from Customer" ,"" ,"" ,"" ,"", i )

);

// Return the resulting string

sResult;


Note: if you email me a request for a sample report, I will email you an rpt file that demonstrates this functionality.

Note: you may refer to a saved encrypted password by its name. See information about this in the ExecuteSQLCanConnect() section.

Geo

 

uflDistance()


Arguments:
(lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit_of_measure)

lat1, lon1 are the latitude and longitude of point 1 (in decimal degrees)
      lat2, lon2 are the latitude and longitude of point 2 (in decimal degrees)
      unit_of_measure is how the result should be provided:

‘m’ for miles, ‘k’ for kilometers, ‘n’ for nautical miles
           

This function calculates the distance between two points (given the latitude/longitude of those points). Note that south latitudes are negative, east longitudes are positive.


Returns: Distance in the requested units of measure.

Example:   Distance (52.2047, 0.1406 , 53.2047 , 0.1406, "m") returns 69.09

uflDistanceByZip5()


Arguments:
(Zip1, Zip2, unit_of_measure)

Zip1 and Zip2 are the Canadian or  5-digit US zip code of the two points (e.g., “M1B0A9” and “16509”)   unit_of_measure is how the result should be provided:

‘m’ for miles, ‘k’ for kilometers, ‘n’ for nautical miles


Returns: Distance in the requested units of measure.

Example:   DistanceByZip5 ("16509", "M1B  0A9", 'm') returns 4.76 miles

Note: this function requires that the CUT_Light.ini file is installed to the default location of:
c:\Program Files\CUT Light\     Or    c:\Program Files (x86)\CUT Light\

Since it uses a local ini file, it doesn’t depend on a web connection and quota restrictions imposed by DistanceByZip().

uflDistanceByZipUK()


Arguments:
(Zip1, Zip2, unit_of_measure)

Zip1 and Zip2 are the UK Outer Codes  of the two points (e.g., “AB16” and “AB30”)      unit_of_measure is how the result should be provided:

‘m’ for miles, ‘k’ for kilometers, ‘n’ for nautical miles

Returns: Distance in the requested units of measure.

Example:   DistanceByZipUK(“AB16”, “AB30, "k")  returns 48.92 Kilometers
 
Note: this function requires that the CUT_Light.ini file is installed to the default location of:
c:\Program Files\CUT Light\     Or    c:\Program Files (x86)\CUT Light\

Since it uses a local ini file, it doesn’t depend on a web connection and quota restrictions imposed by DistanceByZip().

uflDistanceByZip()


Arguments:
(Zip1, Zip2, unit_of_measure)

Zip1 and Zip2 are the zip code of the two points (e.g., “16563” or “16563-1400”)  unit_of_measure is how the result should be provided:

‘m’ for miles, ‘k’ for kilometers, ‘n’ for nautical miles


Returns: Distance in the requested units of measure.

Example:   Distance (“16509”, “16563-11400, "m")
returns 5.76 (distance in miles between the two points)

Note: this function receives data from a web site, so it requires the computer to have access to the internet. If the function stops performing, you probably exceeded the daily hit quota for the web site.  You should switch to the DistanceByZip5() function which uses a local data file but is restricted to Canadian or 5-digit US zip codes.

 


 

uflGetLatLongFromZip()


Arguments:
(Zip): zip code (e.g., “16563” or “16563-1400”)     

Returns: Latitude/Longitude string.

Example:   GetLatLongFromZip("16563-1400")
returns 42.124621/-79.982133

Note: this function receives data from a web site, so it requires the computer to have access to the internet. If the function stops performing, you probably exceeded the daily hit quota for the web site.  You should switch to the GetLatLongFromZip5() function, which uses a local data file but is restricted to Canadian or 5-digit US zip codes.

uflGetLatLongFromZip5()


Arguments:
(Zip): Canadian or 5-digit US codes (“16563” or "M1B0A9" or "M1B 0A9")     

Returns: Latitude/Longitude string.

Example:   GetLatLongFromZip5("M1B 0A9")   
returns:  43.807304/-79.179753

Note: this function requires that the CUT_Light.ini file is installed to the default location of: c:\Program Files\CUT Light\     Or    c:\Program Files (x86)\CUT Light\

Since it uses a local ini file, it doesn’t depend on a web connection and quota restrictions imposed by GetLatLongFromZip().


 

uflGoogleAddress2LatLong()

Arguments: (Address)

Returns: Latitude/Longitude string.  Error message (starting with ***)  if the process failed

Example:   uFLGoogleGeoAddress2LatLong("5275 Rome Ct, Erie, PA 16509, USA")  
returns:  42.0961719||-80.0294165


Download sample report. Or see image.

You need to follow Google's Instructions to create a cloud project, enable billing, and get your Maps API Key. You then need to set an entry in CUT_Light_Options.ini.
For the 32-bit version of CUT Light, create that file here:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Millet Software\CUT_Light_NET_32\CUT_Light_Options.ini
The entry should look like this (use your own API key of course):
-----------
[Options]
GoogleAPI_Geo=AIzaSyDNR6

uflGoogleDrivingTimeDistance()

Arguments: (Origin, Destination, Units)
Origin/Destination are specified as address or Lat|Long pair ("42.0961719||-80.0294165")
Units: "Metric" to return distance in meters. "Imperial" to return distance in feet.

Returns: a string with 4 elements delimited by '||':
1. Driving time (seconds) assuming we depart now (takes into account traffic conditions)
2. Driving time as nicely formatted text

3. Distance in feet if Units argument was set to "Imperial", meters if "Metric".
4. Distance as nicely formatted text

Returns error message (starting with ***) if the process failed

Example:   uFLGoogleDrivingTimeDistance("5275 Rome Ct, Erie, PA 16509, USA",
                                    "While House, Washington, DC", "Imperial")
 
returns:  20405||5 hours 40 mins||594538||369 mi

Download sample report. Or see image.

You need to follow Google's Instructions to create a cloud project, enable billing, and get your Distance Matrix API Key. You then need to set an entry in CUT_Light_Options.ini. For the 32-bit version of CUT Light, create that file here:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Millet Software\CUT_Light_NET_32\CUT_Light_Options.ini
The entry should look like this (use your own API key of course):
-----------
[Options]
GoogleAPI_Distance=AIzaSyBcu

Excel

 

uflGetXLSValue()

Arguments: (Workbook, Worksheet, Cell)

 

Returns:  The text of the excel cell value
               Returns “Workbook Not Found” if the file can’t be found.  
               Returns “Worksheet Not Found” if the worksheet can’t be found

           

Example:   GetXLSValue (“c:\temp\test.xlsx”, “Sales”, "B2")

Notes:
1. If you leave the sheet name blank (“”) or as “1” the first sheet in the workbook is used.

uflSetXLSValue()

Arguments: (Workbook, Worksheet, Cell, NewValue)

 

Returns:  OK or error message.
               Returns “Workbook Not Found” if the file can’t be found.  
               Returns “Worksheet Not Found” if the worksheet can’t be found

           

Example:   SetXLSValue ("c:\temp\test.xlsx", "Sales", "B2", "MyNewValue")

Notes:
1. If you leave the sheet name blank ("") or as "1" the first sheet in the workbook is used.
2. NewValue is specified inside double quotes, but treated as if typed into the cell, so "100.2" would become a number, while "'100.2" would become text in the spreadsheet due to the single quote.

uflGetXLSOutput()

This function allows you to plug Crystal values as input to an Excel model and get some output back. One typical use scenario is VLOOKUP tables, allowing users to maintain lookup logic in Excel without needing to modify the Crystal report.


Arguments:
(Workbook, Worksheet, InputCell, InputCellValue, OutputCell)

 

Returns:  The text of the excel OutputCell after plugging the InputCellValue into InputCell
               Returns “Workbook Not Found” if the file can’t be found.  
               Returns “Worksheet Not Found” if the worksheet can’t be found

           

Example:   GetXLSOutput ("c:\temp\test.xlsx", "", "B2", {@LookUpValue}, "C4")

Notes:
1. If you leave the sheet name blank (“”) or as “1” the first sheet in the workbook is used.

uflXLSLookUp()

This function allows you to look up a value in one column and return the corresponding value (from the same row) in another column.
The advantages of using this newer function compared to uflGetXLSOutput are:

a)      Doesn't require Excel to be installed on the same machine

b)      Much faster

c)      Doesn't require a VLOOKUP() or similar logic within the spreadsheet

Arguments: (Workbook, Worksheet, Lookup Value, Lookup Column, ReturnFrom Column)
note: all arguments are of String type, even if the value in excel is numeric

 

Returns:  The text of the value found in the corresponding column

               Returns "LookUp Value Not Found" if the lookup value is not found within the Lookup Column

           

Example:         GetXLSOutput ("c:\temp\test.xlsx", "Emails", "7882", "C", "Q")

Notes: the 'Lookup column' doesn't need to be to the left of the 'ReturnFrom Column'.






 

Font

 

uflGetTextWidth()


Arguments:
(Text, FontName, FontSize, Bold, Italic, Units)

 

Returns:  The width of the text in specified Units (“Twips” or “Pixels”)
               -1 if an error occurs

Note: 1440 twips = 1 inch

           

Examples:  GetTextWidth({Employee.Last Name}, "Arial", 10, False, False, "Pixels")
GetTextWidth({Employee.Last Name}, "Arial", 10, False, False, "Twips")

 

uflGetFontSizeToFitText()


Arguments:
(Text, FontName, Available Width, Bold, Italic, Units)

The Units argument reflects the units in which Available Width was specified:
“Inches”, “Centimeters”, “Twips”, or “Pixels”.
 

Returns:  The largest font size that would fit the specified text within the available width.
               -1 if an error occurs

Example: GetFontSizeToFitText(“This is Some Text”, "Arial", 2, False, False, "Inches")
        returns a value of 18 (so font size of 18 is the largest that would fit that text in 2 Inches)
    
Note: typically used to dynamically control the font size of a field/formula in Crystal.

uflGetTextHeight()


Arguments:
(Text, MaxWidth, FontName, FontSize, Bold, Italic)

 

Returns:  The height of the wrapped text in inches, when fitted into the MaxWidth (in inches)
               -1 if an error occurs

Examples:  GetTextHeight ({@SomeText}, 3.5, "Arial", 10, False, False)

 

 

uflGetTextNumberOfLines()


Same as GetTextHeight(), but returns number of wrapped lines rather than text height.



 

Encryption


ufl
BlowFishEncrypt()


Arguments:
(StringToEncrypt, Key)

 

Returns:  The encrypted text (as HEX)  using the BlowFish algorithm.

For example: BlowFishEncrypt ("MilletSoftware", "Sesame" )

Returns:

268BA82DCA546F2C4E107E9C8AF16546318A8E275BDE0F8D1C5BBD663C8DF10E

Note: StringtoEncrypt can’t exceed 254 characters. If you try to pass a string larger than that, the function returns: “"String to Encrypt Must Be Less Than 255 Characters"

Note however that the returned encrypted string may be longer than 254 characters

uflBlowFishDecrypt()


Arguments:
(StringToDecrypt, Key)

 

Returns:  The decrypted text using the BlowFish algorithm.

For example:
BlowFishDecrypt ("268BA82DCA546F2C4E107E9C8AF16546318A8E275BDE0F8D1C5BBD663C8DF10E", "Sesame" )

Returns:

MilletSoftware

 

Note: StringtoDecrypt can’t exceed 254 characters. If you try to pass a string larger than that, the function returns: “"String to Decrypt Must Be Less Than 255 Characters"
If the string you need to decrypt is longer, use BlowFishDecryptSegment() (see next page).


 

uflBlowFishDecryptSegment()


Arguments:
(Key, Segment1, Segment2, Segment3, Segment4, Segment5)

Note: Key is the first argument in this function (unlike the prior function).

Returns:  The result (as HEX) of decrypting the combined text of all segments using the BlowFish algorithm.

For example: BlowFishEncryptSegment (“Sesame”, "MilletSoftware", "", "", "","" )

Returns:

268BA82DCA546F2C4E107E9C8AF16546318A8E275BDE0F8D1C5BBD663C8DF10E

This function is like BlowFishDecrypt() but it allows you to break the text you need to decrypt into up to 5 segments that are each no longer than 254 characters.

Here is a Crystal formula sample that automatically breaks a string to such segments

StringVar Plain_String := "Long Plain Text or a reference to a Crystal field/formula”;

StringVar Encrypted_String := BlowFishEncrypt(Plain_String, "Sesame");
StringVar Decrypted_String;

 

IF Len(Encrypted_String) <=  254 Then

        Decrypted_String := BlowFishDecryptSegments("Sesame",

        Encrypted_String, "", "", "", "")

Else If Len(Encrypted_String) <= 254 * 2 Then

        Decrypted_String := BlowFishDecryptSegments("Sesame",

        Left(Encrypted_String, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, 254 + 1), "", "", "")

Else If Len(Encrypted_String) <= 254 * 3 Then

        Decrypted_String := BlowFishDecryptSegments("Sesame",

        Left(Encrypted_String, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, 254 + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 2) + 1), "", "")

Else If Len(Encrypted_String) <= 254 * 4 Then

        Decrypted_String := BlowFishDecryptSegments("Sesame",

        Left(Encrypted_String, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, 254 + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 2) + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 3) + 1), "")

Else If Len(Encrypted_String) <= 254 * 5 Then

        Decrypted_String := BlowFishDecryptSegments("Sesame",

        Left(Encrypted_String, 254), Mid(Encrypted_String, 254 + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 2) + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 3) + 1, 254),

        Mid(Encrypted_String, (254 * 4) + 1))

else Decrypted_String := "Encrypted String is Too Long";

 


 

Email

 

uflEmailSetOptionsIniFile()

Arguments: full path and name of the ini file storing processing options.

       For example:  
         SetOptionsIniFile("C:\ProgramData\MilletSoftware\VC_11\DataLink_Viewer.ini")


Returns: "OK" if successful, failure message otherwise.

You may point to an existing DataLink Viewer.ini file used by Visual CUT or you may first call this function when the ini file doesn’t exist yet. If the ini file doesn’t exist, the function automatically creates it and all the entries shown below.  you can then:
a) use Notepad to update entries, and

b) call uflEmailSaveEncryptedPassword() to encrypt and save the email authentication password (if your SMTP server requires password authentication). [Options] Email_Default_SMTP_Server=??? Email_SMTP_Port=??? Email_User_ID= // the following entry is set only by calling uflEmailSavePasswordEncrypted() Email_Encrypted_Password_CUT_Light= E2484C7AB94FD7C525F177D… Email_StartTLS=False  Email_Connect_Timeout=40 Email_Connect_Retries=4 Email_Message_Timeout=60 Email_Failure_Notices_To= Email_Bounce_Address= Email_Send_Encrypted=False Email_Send_Signed=False Email_Outgoing_Folder= Email_SMTP_Domain= Email_SMTP_Disconnect_After_Send=True Email_SocksHostname= Email_SocksPort= Email_SocksUsername= Email_SocksPassword= Email_SocksVersion= Check_Email_Addresses=TRUE Email_POP3_Server=

 


 

uflSetEmailSaveEncryptedPassword()

Arguments: the unencrypted password.

       For example: 
             SetEmailSaveEncryptedPassword("MyPassword")


Returns: "OK" if successful, failure message otherwise.

When successful, the encrypted password is saved to the Email_Encrypted_Password_CUT_Light entry in the [Options] section of the ini file established by a prior call to EmailSetOptionsIniFile().

 

While you must call EmailSetOptionsIniFile() everytime you wish to send email, you need to call SetEmailSaveEncryptedPassword()only when the password changes.

 

uflEmailSend()

Arguments: (FromEmail, ToEmailArray, CcEmailArray, BccEmailArray, ReplyToEmail,
                  Subject, MessageArray, AttachmentArray, Priority, LogFile)

Returns: "OK" if successful, failure message otherwise.


The array arguments allow you to specify multiple email addresses and email attachments.

LogFile must be the path and file name of an existing text file.
The MessageArray allows you to divide a very long text or HTML message into 254-charcter segments. Here is an example:
 Local StringVar Message := {@emailMessage}; local stringvar array MessageArray; IF Len(Message) = 0 Then  (  redim Messagearray [1];  MessageArray[1] = ""; ) Else (  Local numbervar segments := RoundUp(Len(Message)/254);  redim Messagearray [segments];  Local numbervar index ;  for index := 0 to segments - 1 step 1 do   (  MessageArray[index + 1] := mid(Message, 1 + (index * 254) , 254)  ); );

 

Full Example

 

Local StringVar Message := {@MyEmailMessage}; // Convert the message to an array with 254-character text segments local stringvar array MessageArray; IF Len(Message) = 0 Then  (redim Messagearray [1];  MessageArray[1] = "";) Else ( Local numbervar segments := RoundUp(Len(Message)/254);  redim Messagearray [segments];  Local numbervar index ;  for index := 0 to segments - 1 step 1 do   (MessageArray[index + 1] := mid(Message, 1 + (index * 254) , 254)); ); // ------------------------------ // Point to the ini file where the email options are stored uFLEmailSetOptionsIniFile("C:\ProgramData\MilletSoftware\VC_11\DataLink_Viewer.ini");  // This is needed (only once) if SMTP server requires a password uFLEmailSaveEncryptedPassword("Your Secret Password");  uFLEmailSend("""From Name"" <ido@MilletSoftware.com>",  """To Name"" <joe@Acme.com>", "", "", "", // to, cc, bcc, ReplyTo  "My Email Subject", MessageArray, {@Attachments},  "Normal", // Priority: "Lowest"/"Low"/"Normal"/"High"/"Highest"  ""); // log file (path & name of an existing text file) if you wish to log email activity

 


 

Specifying Multiple (Simple/Composite) Email Addresses

You specify multiple email address destinations in the To, CC, or BCC emailing options, by simply including multiple entries in the array arguments and/or by separating multiple addresses with a semi-colon (;) without any spaces.  
You can also specify composite (display name as well as address) email destinations. 
For example: "Ido Millet" <ido@MilletSoftware.com>;"Jane Doe" <Jane@aol.com>


Specifying Email Distribution Lists in Text Files

To facilitate emailing to a long list of recipients, you can specify in the
To, CC, and BCC emailing options a file name containing a distribution list.   
For example, using Notepad you can create a file such as:

image

You then specify that Visual CUT should use that file as a distribution list by entering
File:c:\temp\test_email_list.txt  
in the To, CC, or BCC emailing options.

Notes: you use the word "File:" followed by the path & name of the text file containing the email addresses.  Each address should be on a separate line and it can be specified as an email address only or as a composite (display name and address) as shown in the example above.


 

Specifying Email Distribution Lists in SQL Queries

In cases where you wish to dynamically retrieve the list of email addresses using an SQL query against an ODBC data source, you can specify in the To, CC, and/or BCC emailing options an expression such as:

MS Access Example:
ODBC:Customers::User_ID::Password::SELECT [email] FROM [Contacts] WHERE [Customer_ID] = '{Customer_ID}'

 

SQL Server Example:

ODBC:CONTACTS::sa::xxxxx::SELECT DISTINCT AHD.ctct.c_email_addr FROM

AHD.ctct where AHD.ctct.c_email_addr IS NOT NULL

 

The expression starts with ODBC: followed by 4 elements separated by ::

1. ODBC DSN (Note: could be different from the DSN used for the Crystal report)

2. User ID (use a single space if not needed)

3. Password (use a single space if not needed)

4. SQL Statement

Notes:

§  If the SQL statement returns multiple rows, Visual CUT takes care of concatenating the email addresses from all the rows to a single string with semi-colon as the delimiter.

§  The SQL statement syntax depends on your database.  For example, as shown in the samples above, MS Access uses [ ] around field/table names but SQL Server doesn't.

§  You can embed dynamic fields/formula values anywhere inside the expression.
In the MS Access example, the list of contacts for the Customer in the current bursting cycle would be retrieved. This offers powerful email distribution management options...


Attaching Multiple Files

To attach multiple files to a single email message, simply include multiple entries in the AttachmentArray argument or specify multiple files and separate  them with a semi-colon (;) Without any spaces. 

If all files are under the same folder, it's enough to specify the full path only for the 1st file. 
For example: c:\temp\Sales.pdf;Returns.pdf

You can also specify file names using wild cards
For example, in a bursting scenario, to send all pdf files in the current month folder under the current customer:

C:\VC_Exports\{customer.customer_id}\{@Month}\*.pdf

and to send all files that start with the current Customer ID:

C:\VC_Exports\{customer.customer_id}*.*

 

 

Specifying a Different Character Set

In order to override the default character set (iso-8859-1) you should add an entry to the [Options] section of DataLink_Viewer.ini.  For example, in order to support Chinese characters, you should add the following entry:
Email_Char_Set=big5

 

Queuing Emails & The smtpQ Service

If you are also using Visual CUT, by specifying an outgoing folder (Email_Outgoing_Folder) in the ini file, you can direct outgoing email messages (as eml files) to an outgoing folder. For more detail, see the Visual CUT user manual.

 

 

 

uflIsValidEmail()


Arguments:
(email address)

Returns:
True if the email address looks valid. False otherwise.

Note: the logic only ensures correct structure and no invalid characters.  It doesn’t check the domain and doesn’t test whether the email address actually exists.

 

uflIsValidEmails()


Arguments:
(email addresses separated by a separator, The separator)

Returns:
True if all email addresses looks valid. False otherwise.

Note: the logic only ensures correct structure and no invalid characters.  It doesn’t check the domain and doesn’t test whether the email address actually exists.

Example: Isvalidemails("ido@MilletSoftware.com;ixm7@psu.edu", ";")

Returns True



 

Update History

 

Version 6.4.9035 (10/21/2017):

¨      added uflBBarcode...() versions to all 16 barcode functions. Two key benefits:

§  Simpler to use: because they return the path to the image file. So a single function call in the 'Graphic Location' property of a picture is all you need.

§  Better Error Handling: CUT Light automatically fits the text (font size & wrapping) of the error message in the image and returns the path to it. So instead of a barcode image, you see an image of the error message. This makes troubleshooting simpler. It also avoids displaying the wrong image (original image used when designing the report).

See example of the simplified calls, including one case with an error returned here.

 

Version 6.4.9034 (10/18/2017):

¨      Added Barcode39(), Barcode93(), Barcode128(), BarcodeCodeBar(), BarcodeITF(), BarcodeMSI(), BarcodePlessey(), BarcodeUpcA(), BarcodeUpcE(),BarcodeUpcEanExtension(), BarcodeEAN8(), BarcodeEAN13() function to generate barcodes of these types on the fly without dependency on font files. See example.

¨      Added BatchFileRun() function allowing triggering BAT or CMD files, with an option to hide the batch file window.

¨      CmdRun() as well as BatchFileRun() now require a 1-time user permission to trigger such functions. The permission is stored as an entry in the CUT_Light_Options.ini file.

Version 6.4.9031 (9/15/2017):

¨      Packaged with newer component

¨      Fixed sporadic Google API handshake issue.

Version 6.4.9029 (7/27/2017):

¨      Added XLSLookUp() function for fast lookups without needing excel to be installed.

¨      Added GoogleAddress2LatLong() function to get the Latitude and Longitude of an address.

¨      Added GoogleDrivingTimeDistance() function to get driving time (taking into account current traffic conditions) and distance between two locations specified as addresses or Latitude|Longitude.

¨      Fixed 2 Input Box functions.

Version 6.4.9025 (6/21/2017):

¨      Added support for removing the quiet zone around QR Barcode by setting the AddedMargin argument to -1.


 

Version 6.4.9024 (5/30/2017):

¨      Changed httpToimage() function to
a) also support png and bmp images,
b) support an optional argument of ImageWidth (useful when the web page is responsive and you wish to target a certain width), and
c) support an optional Wait4Load argument specifying waiting time in milliseconds, allowing the web page to fully load before being captured as image.

¨      Optimized httpToimage() and html2image() to reduce memory consumption.

¨      Added httpExists() function (treats redirect as failure)

¨      Added FileUnzip() function.

Version 6.4.9019 (4/8/2017):

¨      Added IpDot2Long() and IpLong2Dot() functions to convert IP addresses between dot and number representations.

Version 6.4.9018 (2/17/2017):

¨      Implemented code changes to support new deployment to non-standard application location.

Version 6.4.9017 (10/26/2016):

¨      Added GoogleTranslate() function, allowing you to translate any amount of text using the paid ($20 for 1 million characters) Google Translate service. This service supports more than 100 languages.

Version 6.4.9014 (10/17/2016):

¨      Added 4 new functions to render 2D barcodes: BarcodeQR(), BarcodePDF417(), BarcodeDataMatrix(), and BarcodeAztec(). You can use these functions to generate barcode images on the fly and load the image into a picture object on the Crystal report using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).

Version 6.4.9012 (10/11/2016):

¨      Modified setup properties so you can now install both the 32-bit version as well as the 64-bit version on the same computer. This allows you to develop a report using Crystal Designer (32-bit) and test on the same machine using the 64-bit version of DataLink Viewer.

Version 6.4.9011 (9/11/2016):

¨      Added HTML2Image() function to overcome limitations with how Crystal interprets HTML. Instead, it converts the HTML to an image so you can then load the image into a picture object using a dynamic Graphic Location expression (see example).

¨      Added ConvertRTF2Text() function to convert Rich Text to Plain Text (see example).

¨      Functions that accept sql1,sql2,sql3,sql4,sql5 arguments no longer insert spaces while combining them into a single SQL statement. This avoids problems when a space should be avoiding. If you need a space, simply include it at the start or end of a segment.

Version 6.4.9009 (8/28/2016):

¨      Added httpToImage() function to allow capturing web page as image and bringing it into the report via the Graphic Location expression.

¨      Added FileCompare() function to check if the content of 2 files is the same.

Version 6.4.9008 (8/3/2016):

¨      Packaged with newer Chilkat component.

 

Version 6.4.9007 (4/26/2016):

¨      Added SecondsToTimeString() function to convert seconds to a formatted time string.

¨      Added TimeStringtoSeconds() function to convert a time string to seconds.

Version 6.4.9006 (4/13/2016):

¨      Added LookupResetEntries() function to reset all entries previously set via LookupAddEntry() calls. This is useful in cases where a user runs multiple reports without closing the reporting software (Crystal, DataLink Viewer, …) between reports.

 

Version 6.4.9005 (3/19/2016):

¨      Added LookupAddEntry() and LookupGetEntry() functions. This allows storing and retrieving Kay-Value pairs in memory (for example, across report/subreport boundaries) without the complexity and 1K rows limitations of array variables.

Version 6.4.9004 (2/24/2016):

¨      Added ImageResize()function. This allows creating a resized version of a given image file. The resized version can then be loaded into the report using the Picture location expression.

Version 6.4.9001  (10/12/2015):

¨      Added GetTextHeight() and GetTextNumberOfLine() function. These functions provide information about the height and number of lines of wrapped text given the allowed width and the font type, font size, and style.

Version 6.4.8002  (9/26/2015):

¨      Added httpCallServiceGetTokens() function to call a web service and return one or more tokens. For example, this can be used to send an SMS message.

Version 6.4.6005  (9/19/2015):

¨      Added a 64-bit version of the UFL.

Version 6.4.6001  (8/13/2015):

¨      Added SetXLSValue() function to set the value of a spreadsheet cell.

¨      Added FileDelete(), FileRename(), and FileCopy() functions.

¨      Added CmdRun() function to pass a command line to Cmd.exe

Version 6.4.4001  (8/5/2015):

¨      Fixed a problem causing DistanceByZip(), DistanceByZip5(), and DistanceByUK() to not be available in Crystal formula editor.

¨      Optimized DistanceByZip(), DistanceByZip5(), and DistanceByUK() to be much faster.

¨      Added information for missing USA zip codes.

Version 6.4.2001  (6/4/2015):

¨      Packaged with a newer Chilkat dll to match the version used by Visual CUT

¨      Added httpFileDownloadRename() function to return the original file name downloaded from the server and to elect to keep or restore that name to the downloaded file.

Version 6.3.1006  (4/1/2015)

¨      Added 3 Regular Expression functions:

§  RegExpReplace() for text replace functionality

§  RegExpMatch() for finding and extracting text that matches a pattern

§  RegExpIsMatch() for validating that a string matches a pattern

¨      Added ConvertRTFFileToText() for converting RTF file to plain text file.

¨      Added ExecuteSQLReturnFile() for retrieving the content of a database column in a specific record, optionally converting the content:
RTF to Plain Text or
Any image type to bmp, png, jpeg, or gif (including an option to convert transparent background to Bitmap with white background), and saving the result to a file.

 

Version 6.3.1  (1/2/2015): Released .NET version.

 


Known Issues and Limitation

 

1.      Function arguments passed to a UFL should not exceed 254 characters. That is why some of the functions provided by CUT Light allow you to specify array arguments or use several arguments that are internally combined. In other cases, you simply need to chop the string into segments and loop. For example, here is how you can write a large string to a text:

 

StringVar MyText := {@LargeText};

StringVar TargetFile := "c:\temp\test.txt";

// chop and write the text in 254 character segments

While Len(MyText) > 254 Do

    (
    FileAddText (TargetFile, Left(MyText, 254), False, False);

    MyText := Mid(MyText, 255);

    );

// write the remaining small segment

FileAddText (TargetFile, MyText, False, False);

 

 

2.      In cases where a function accepts array arguments (for example, EmailSend(), you can convert a long string to multiple array elements (each at a maximum of 254 characters. The user manual section about EmailSend() provides an example.

3.      A simple preview of a Crystal report may trigger evaluation/formatting of only the 1st page.
If you want the Master report to be fully processed upon initial preview (without manually scrolling to the last page), you may need to insert a Special Field such as “Page N of M” to force immediate processing for the whole report.

4.      Crystal XI suffers from an issue (ADAPT00755322) leading to a termination of Crystal when running a report that uses dynamic parameters on a machine that also has a UFL installed.  If you are using Crystal XI and reports with dynamic parameters, you should not install UFLs until Business Objects resolves this issue.